Google Map of Campus Hate Flyers

Background

There have been numerous media stories recounting all the hate group flyers found on university campuses recently. I decided to record these incidents on a Google Map.

UPDATE 1: We are now up to 130 incidents. I continue to update this map, so if I’m missing incidents, tweet them to me @MeganSquire0 or email them to me.

UPDATE 2: There are now 185 campuses on the map, all cited and color-coded.

The Map

Data sources

Each map “pin” shows which group did the flyering, as well as the link for where I learned of it. These links are usually tweets from the groups themselves or tweets from students who found the flyers. Sometimes I also use news articles, for example from ViceInside Higher EdUSA TodayNPR, and I also have Google News alerts set up for the alt-right groups so when the flyering incidents are picked up in local media, I get those as well.

A Spotter’s Guide to the Alt-Right

Here is a presentation I gave to UNC students and community members last night about A Spotter’s Guide to Signs & Symbols of the Alt-Right, as it exists in 2017. The focus is on local events and those that I have personal familiarity with (e.g. Charlottesville).

A most heartfelt thanks to everyone who supplied photos for this presentation – I could not have made this without their diligence and beautiful camera work.

Found and liberated 2,151 missing DHS files

On January 18, 2017 the US Department of Homeland Security discontinued its Daily Open Source Infrastructure Report service which it had run since October 2006. To enable researchers to study the content of these reports, I collected as many as I could find (2,151 PDF files) and released them to the Internet Archive. You can find them here: DHS Daily Open Source Infrastructure Reports 2006-2017

The PDF files came from the following URLs:

  • https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/
  • https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/nppd/ip/daily-report/
  • https://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/

And when these yielded 404 errors (which they did for most pre-2013 files) I used the Internet Archive itself, with the following URL base:

http://web.archive.org/web/20061101153326/https://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/[filename]

Files are named as they were upon download, in one of the following patterns:

  • DHS_Daily_Report_2006-10-11.pdf (most 2006-2012 files have this format)
  • DHS-Daily-Report-2012-12-06.pdf (a single December 2012 file has this format)
  • dhs-daily-report-2013-01-09 (most 2013-2017 files have this format)

If you are interested in missing dates (for example Archive.org was missing some dates and a few files were corrupted), this blog might be able to help fill in the gaps.

 

Changes to Professor Watchlist – who was removed?

Nearly 12,000 professors have used the AAUP’s “Add My Name” feature in order to be added to Turning Point USA’s Professor Watchlist, and large groups of faculty from Trinity University and University of Notre Dame, among others, have also requested to join. The Professor Watchlist was created in order to expose professors who “advance a radical agenda in lecture halls” and inclusion on the list is supposed to be based on “incidents that have already been reported by a credible source.”

How has the list changed?

The Professor Watchlist debuted in November with 146 names, and has grown to 166 names as of January 3, 2016. I was curious who has been added (obviously not all 12,000 who requested to be added!), and even more curious about who has been taken off the list.

So I created a Google Spreadsheet showing the names in November and the names as they show up in January. I got the November list from archive.org’s Wayback Machine, and the current list from the Professor Watchlist website.

Google Spreadsheet showing additions & removals

Data cleaning steps

  • I re-alphabetized 4 names that were out of order on the November list
  • I lined up the names so we could more easily see who was added/removed
  • I colorized each name with red if it was removed since November, and green if it was added since November.

Findings

Unfortunately, the Wayback Machine does not have the original PW pages indexed for each individual professor, so I can’t go back and see what they wrote for each, but based on what I was able to find online, the rationales for these seven seem very flimsy.

Anyway, at a rate of only 35 changes in a month, Turning Point is going to hire some more interns to enter all these 12,000 names! Good luck with that.

Analysis of the latest 1000 Facebook posts by the Times-News (Aug-Dec)

I was playing around with some code today from Mastering Social Media Mining with Python (by Marco Bonzanini, and published by the same company that published my last two books), and I came up with this snazzy set of scripts (postGetter.py, fileParser.py) that mines the last X posts from any public Facebook page, creates a clickable FB url for each, sorts them in order of most interactions (shares + likes), and creates a spreadsheet with the results.

Here are the results when run for the last 1000 posts by the Times-News of Burlington, our local newspaper: timesNews.csv.

Findings?

Not that surprising or shocking, but here goes. The last 1000 only goes back to August or so (modify the params at the top of the code to make it scrape more), but the top five posts for August-December based on interactions seem to be:

  1. The death of Tim-Bob from Graham Cinema
  2. The abduction of a middle schooler from a bus stop
  3. Kmart closing
  4. 25-minute Christmas Lights show on Maple Ridge Dr.
  5. Housing emergency at Burlington Animal Services

No election-related or weather-related items cracked the top 20.